Geijsen: Genetic disorders

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The Geijsen group studies human genetic disorders, such as muscular dystrophy using gene editing techniques.

Pluripotent stem cells can divide almost indefinitely and have the unique ability to give rise to every cell type in our body. For this reason, they are the most versatile source of stem cells for (drug) research and transplantation therapy. The first human pluripotent stem cell lines were derived from early un-implanted blastocyst embryos, that develop about 6-8 days after fertilization. Such embryos are typically left over after in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and would otherwise have remained frozen or be discarded. While human embryonic stem cells have the potential to revolutionize the ways we study and treat human disease, their moral status has also been the source of intense ethical debate.

Key publications

DAZL limits pluripotency, differentiation, and apoptosis in developing primordial germ cells

Chen HH, Welling M, Bloch DB, Muñoz J, Mientjes E, Chen X, Tramp C, Wu J, Yabuuchi A, Chou YF, Buecker C, Krainer A, Willemsen R, Heck AJ, Geijsen N.

Stem Cell Reports 3(5):892-904.

Download|2014

In vitro generation of germ cells from Embryonic Stem Cells

West JA, Park IH, Daley GQ, Geijsen N.

Nature Protocols 1(4):2026-2036.

2006

Derivation of embryonic germ cells and male gametes from embryonic stem cells

Geijsen N, Horoschak M, Kim K, Gribnau J, Eggan K, Daley GQ.

Nature.427, 148-154.

Download|2004

A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells.

Buecker C, Chen HH, Polo JM, Daheron L, Bu L, Barakat TS, Okwieka P, Porter A, Gribnau J, Hochedlinger K, Geijsen N.

Cell Stem Cell. Jun 4;6(6):535-46.

Download|2010

The growth factor environment defines distinct pluripotent ground states in novel blastocyst-derived stem cells.

Chou Y-F, Chen H-H, Eijpe M, Yabuuchi A, Chenoweth JG, Tesar P, Lu J, McKay RDG, Geijsen N.

Cell. 135: 449-461.

Download|2008

Group leader

Niels Geijsen

Niels Geijsen is group leader at the Hubrecht Institute professor of Regenerative Medicine at Utrecht University. His group focuses on understanding the biology of pluripotent stem cells and developing new stem-cell based tools to explore human development and oncogenic transformation. In addition, the Geijsen group uses the CRISPR/Cas technology to study mutations that cause diseases such as FSHD (Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy). Recently they have developed a new technology, called iTOP, to deliver the molecules needed for CRISPR/Cas into cells.

Scientific training and positions

Current other activities


Group members

Niels Geijsen

Principal Investigator

Stefan van der Elst

Technician

Axel Beier

Technician

Melissa van Kranenburg

Technician

Jorik Bot

Technician

Lin Lin

Postdoc

Pascale Dijkers

Postdoc

Fanny Sage

Postdoc

Javier Frias Aldeguer

PhD Student

Ator Ashoti

PhD Student

Lianne Kraaier

Student

Darnell Kammeron

Student

Nicolas Rivron

Guest

Peng Shang

Guest

Richard Sherwood

Guest

Zhihan Zhao

Guest

Marco de Boer

Guest

Ruud Out

Guest

Marieke Visscher

Guest

Kim Ogink

Guest

Anna Chatsisvili

Guest

Helen Buttstedt

Guest

Isaac Brete

Guest